Posts Tagged ‘critical psychiatry’

“The great advantage with thinking about psychiatric practice in terms of narrative, as Brad Lewis (2011) points out in his excellent book, Narrative Psychiatry (see http://www.madinamerica.com/2012/09/narrative-psychiatry-a-review/)  is that it refuses to privilege a particular view of the world, and thus places different narratives on the same footing. This does not, however, result in a free-for-all relativistic morass, because it opens up to scrutiny the contrasting ethical and moral positions of different actors, the person identified as ‘patient’, the psychiatrist, other mental health workers, the community and indeed the culture in which these stories are embedded. It’s not a case of anything goes, but a way of foregrounding what Pat Bracken and I have referred to as ‘ethics before evidence’ in Postpsychiatry (Bracken & Thomas, 2001).”

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☞ It is clear that the narrative turn can also be seen in psychiatry. Although this article refers to critical psychiatry, it evidently aims to influence the profession and discipline as a whole.